Final Cut Pro Re-dux – Read These FCP Quick Guides and Get Professional Results

MAKE IT EASY ON YOURSELF!
People may need a bit of a follow-up on Final Cut techniques, so please use the links below to read and download the following information:

Edit1

Getting started with Final Cut Pro >> FCP_QuickReferenceGettingStarted

Creating Text and Titles in FCP  >> FCP_QuickReferenceTextTitles

Audio editing, audio effects, audio sweetening >> FCP_QuickReference_Audio

Creating a QT movie file from your project  >> FCP_QuickReference_ExportQT

And if you can’t find it above, check the complete FCP 7 and FCP X manuals, below

The complete Final Cut Pro 7 Manual  >> FinalCutPro7UserManual

The complete Final Cut Pro X Manual  >> final_cut_pro_x_user_guide


Nov. 19: Cut to Swipe at the Museum of Modern Art – let’s meet there!

MoMApic

Exhibition: Cut to Swipe, on the second floor – the gallery is directly to the right of the escalator.

Wednesday, November 19

Class meets at 11:30 at the Museum of Modern Art, in the area outside the Cut to Swipe exhibition space, at the top of the escalator.

GO TO THE INFORMATION DESK, PRESENT YOUR CUNY ID, AND GET A FREE TICKET
DO NOT WAIT IN THE TICKET LINE / BRING YOUR CUNY I.D. FOR FREE ADMISSION

We will be there from 11:30 pm – 12:30 pm

Address:
Museum of Modern Art
11 W. 53rd Street
NYC 10019

How to get there:
Take the No. 6 Train to 51st St./Lexington Ave.
Walk North 2 blocks to 53rd Street.
Walk 3-1/2 blocks West to MoMA Entrance at 11. W. 53rd St.

Take the B, D, F, or M train to 47-50th St. Rockefeller Center.
Board at the front of the train. Exit at 47-50th Street/6th Avenue.
Walk North to 53rd Street, and walk 1/2 block East to the MoMA entrance at 11 W. 53rd St.

or,

Take the E or M train to 5th Avenue/53rd St.
Walk 1/2 block West to the MoMA entrance at 11 W. 53rd St.

or,

Take the X10 Bus – schedule is here >> x10 to Madison Ave. + E. 54th Street, Manhattan
Walk South 1 block to 53rd Street and walk 1-1/2 blocks West to 11 W. 53rd St.

View Google Maps

DO NOT DRIVE TO THE MUSEUM – PARKING WILL BE DIFFICULT OR NON-EXISTENT.

MEET ON THE SECOND FLOOR IN THE AREA OUTSIDE THE GALLERY, AT THE TOP OF THE ESCALATOR.


Assignment:

Take notes, including the titles of works on view, the artist’s/maker’s name, medium, and date.
The museum allows visitors to take photos of this exhibit, so take photos to remind yourself of the works on view.
Write down your impressions of what exhibitions you visited, and choose one or two works to write about in class next week. You will be writing 1 -2 pages in class.

Preparation for this assignment includes looking up the artist and the work. Find out more about the artist and the background and context for the work. Bring your notes to class.


Acquaint yourselves with the films and person of British filmmaker Derek Jarman

Derek Jarman
British Filmmaker Derek Jarman (1942 – 1994)
Artist, poet, filmmaker, gay rights activist

We are screening Derek Jarman’s last film, BLUE (76 minutes, 1993) on October 29. Please be prepared to think!


Derek Jarman: five essential films – British Film Institute
http://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/lists/derek-jarman-five-essential-films

Queer Pagan Punk: The Films of Derek Jarman at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM)
http://www.bam.org/film/2014/derek-jarman?gclid=CNyAkNziyMECFQIF7AodlXYA1Q


Blue

film by Derek Jarman

This “film” (if film it be), the last to be completed by the painter and diarist Jarman before his death early this year of AIDS, is, I’m pretty sure, the best movie I’ve ever seen (if it’s even “seeable”). One hour and seventeen minutes of luminous blue 35mm glow, unchanging, calming, irritating, numbing, and a soundtrack laboriously collaged out of snippets of sound and music and Jarman’s meditations on his encroaching blindness and approaching death, and on the blindness of the world to its own slower but equally inevitable demise.

Jarman, the consummate image-crafter, whose films are quite literally “moving pictures,” coming to grips with the disappearance of all images from his field of vision, then the disappearance of his own self-image into the all-transcending blue of death. Realizing that, on the world’s screen, he has no image; as a queer, an outsider, none of the images he has midwifed into the world will be allowed to have lives of their own and enter the viral give-and-take of autonomous phantasms that is “culture.” So, facing death, he faces not the immediate post-mortem acclaim granted to those who, while unbearably unproductive while alive, were, at least, fertile; but rather the amnesia our society reserves for those whose existence it has never acknowledged in the first place.

“From the bottom of your heart, pray to be released from image.”

But of course, none of this stuff is why I wanted to mention it to you; I brought it up because it struck me, like a bolt out of the blue, as an answer to my prayer in my anti-review of Dracula, six months ago. A cinema that has transcended its own images. Even-tually the effect of the droning blue screen is that you are inside Derek Jarman’s head, seeing what he sees (nothing), hearing what he hears, both outside and inside, and then, when the movie’s over…The one truly human experience, death, communicated, by a master artist transcending the materials and limitations of his own art by facing his own nonexistence, and ours.

The film’s ancestors would be the monochromies of [French conceptual artist/painter] Yves Klein (the color is actually very similar to International Klein Blue), he of the “leap into the void”; it doesn’t take very long before the brain (or the world), like a sponge, soaks up the blue of the screen (the same way it would have fed on the fast food of images, had there been any) and, in the unified blue of the blue world, we attain, as the old Tibetan texts say, the faculty of walking in the sky, if only for this short, magic hour and seventeen minutes of cinematic time.

And so it is that, at the movie’s very end, in the midst of an incredibly lyrical and erotically charged love song, Jarman is strangely reassuring about the world’s blindness. “Our name will be forgotten, in time, no one will remember our work,” he says, as if this is a good thing, because it allows us to concentrate on our love, which is what really matters. Freed from self-conception as artists, queers, or anything else, we are free to become what only death can make us, human, and hence free to realize the true potential of our estate. Beyond words, beyond names, beyond subject and object “In the pandemonium of image, I bring you the universal Blue.”

—Gridley Minima

from Queer Cultural Center:
http://www.queerculturalcenter.org/Pages/Jarman/JarmanBRev.html

Wikipedia is a good place to find out more about this filmmaker:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derek_Jarman

Blue, by Derek Jarman


The full text of BLUE, which is pure poetry, can be found here >> http://www.evanizer.com/articles/blue/index.html
[parental warning! this text (and film) contains a small amount of angry gay activist rude language]


Audio Recording for Video and Using the Zoom H4 Digital Field Recorder

Audio Recording class handouts also available here for downloading:

Audio & Video Connectors – know your cables by their proper names >> AudioVideoConnectors

Basic sound recording techniques >> SoundRecordingBasics

Know your microphones and mic pick-up patterns >> FilmmakersHandbook_Audio

And below, a video about Audio Recording to give you a preview of what we’ll be doing in class:


Audio for Video in 4 Steps – Videomaker Magazine

1. Survey the Location
2. Close the Gap
3. Choose a Mic
4. Problems & Solutions


Using the Zoom H4 Digital Field Recorder (DFR)

Here’s the complete manual >> ZoomH4_DFR

and…


Final Cut Pro Reference Sheets and Manuals

MAKE IT EASY ON YOURSELF!
People may need a bit of a follow-up on Final Cut techniques, so please use the links below to read and download the following information:

Getting started with Final Cut Pro >> FCP_QuickReferenceGettingStarted

Creating Text and Titles in FCP  >> FCP_QuickReferenceTextTitles

Creating a QT movie file from your project  >> FCP_QuickReference_ExportQT

The complete Final Cut Pro 7 Manual  >> FinalCutPro7UserManual

The complete Final Cut Pro X Manual  >> final_cut_pro_x_user_guide

Audio editing, audio effects, audio sweetening >> FCP_QuickReference_Audio

Lighting is an art as much as a science…

What is 3-point lighting? This is the basic lighting starting point for all creative manipulations of lighting >> 3PointLighting

And here is information about the equipment available for the CIN 211 class and about Lighting Safety >> LightingBasics


Here are detailed illustrated instruction sheets for the light kits available for CIN 211:


And below are videos that go over some of what we did in our Lighting Lab, and a few additional pointers about lighting a scene.

1. Video Lighting Technique: Turning a Hard Light into a Soft Light
Izzy Video by Israel Hyman – this guy is good!
This is about modifying your light quality using the Lowel DP, which is one of the kits you can check out at the Cage.


2. Videography: Lighting for Video
LightsFilmSchool.com

3. Filmmaking 101 – 3-Point Lighting Tutorial
with Steve DiCasa